Understanding Home Theater Speakers: Part 2

3d1Speakers are arguably the most important part of any home theater setup. They’re certainly where one should invest the bulk of one’s money. You’ll keep good speakers a lot longer than any other home theater gear, especially AV receivers, disc players, and streaming media boxes.

Also check out the previous blog post, Understanding Home Theater Speakers: Part 1. The following is an excerpt from my Amazon Kindle book Home Theater for the Internet Age.

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Curt Robbins


Center Channel

The center channel, as you’ve already learned, is dedicated to TV and movie dialog (it’s nice to hear the sound coming from where a character’s mouth appears) and enhancing the overall immersive quality of music emanating from the speakers facing you. As mentioned, it’s highly advised that your center is from the same series as your front mains. More powerful center channels feature more drivers. Thus, a basic config might be a single midrange or full-range driver, while a more sophisticated example would feature a couple of woofers, one or more midrange drivers, a tweeter, and maybe even ports.

It should be noted that most high-resolution surround sound music formats, such as SACD, and DVD-Audio, all give music publishers the ability to record a center channel as part of a song or album. (See the Disc-Based Music chapter for more information regarding these high-resolution music formats.) Center channel speakers range in cost from under $100 to several thousand.

Subwoofer

As you’ve already learned, a subwoofer is simply a speaker dedicated to the lowest audio frequencies, which you can literally feel in addition to hear. If you really want to shake the house or wake the neighbors, a large, powerful sub can do it. Barry White should have owned a sub company.

A sub is unique in that, unlike your other speakers, it’s a powered unit (300 to 800 watts is common). Don’t dismiss the capabilities of a high-quality 10, 12, or even 15-inch subwoofer. For movies especially, it will become one of your favorite speakers (and something you’ll want to turn down when the kids are asleep).

Omnidirectional

The subwoofer is also unusual among other speakers in that it’s mostly omnidirectional, meaning where it resides in the room and where it’s pointed (the direction in which it fires) are much less important than with your other speakers. This is nice for tucking it discretely behind a sofa or under an end table. Some models, like the uniquely slim $1,400 Paradigm MilleniaSub and the $2,000 REL Habitat1, are specifically designed for narrow spaces, such as under a sofa.

Most subwoofers feature a digital amp. While models with Class A/B analog amps are available, they’re less common. Incorporating a digital amp allows a model to be smaller, consume less energy, and perform with greater efficiency. Just to confuse things, there are also hybrid varieties that employ both analog and digital circuitry at a variety of prices and quality levels. Like other speakers, some subs feature relief ports, a nice addition because ported subs can produce greater output. Subs that aren’t ported are called sealed (just like headphones). The PB series from SVS is a good example, featuring models with between one and three ports each, priced from $500 to $2,000.

Driver Configs & Second Helpings

Like regular floor standing and surround speakers, subwoofers can feature one or more drivers that fire in a variety of directions. The most common configuration is side firing (like my 10-inch, 500-watt, single-driver sealed B&W ASW700) or down firing (like the 10-inch, 150-watt REL T-5). Klipsch’s best sub, part of its Palladium Series, features two 12” drivers powered by 1000 watts that are side firing and 90 degrees separated (this sub is arguably overkill for most rooms). The majority of subs feature a single side-firing driver that’s between 10 and 15 inches in diameter and commonly powered by 500 watts.

As you’ve learned, some home theater hobbyists add a second sub to their home theater, creating a more balanced low frequency experience with even greater impact. However, in dual-sub environments, placement is critical; typically, you don’t simply stack them on top of each other. The debate between one big sub or a couple of smaller units will never cease in the audiophile world. In the end, it’s determined by your room and budget.


Curt Robbins is author of the following books from Amazon Kindle:

You can follow him on Twitter at @CurtARobbins, read his AV-related blog posts at rAVe Publications, and view his photos on Flickr.

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