The Case for Spotify: Serendipity

3d1I remember when I was a teenager, listening to music on my stereo system, typically using old school over-the-ear headphones so I could crank the volume without gaining the attention of my parents. Of course, I also loved those two bookshelf speakers with the cool blue rubber baffles around the woofers (that I could never really properly exercise if my parents were home).

Playing popular albums from the time, like Breakfast in America by Supertramp or Led Zeppelin IV, I used to wonder: How many others in the world are playing this song right now? After all, I couldn’t be the only person listening to The Logical Song or Black Dog. The world is a big place with billions of people and common cultural trends, but how much serendipity is there, really?

Spotify, one of the leading music streaming services on the internet, is about to find out—at least among its own subscribers. The service recently promoted a cool possible feature called Serendipity. It’s a map that indicates, graphically, when two people listen to the same song at the same time. What defines “the same time”? The system is so strict that users must click Play within one-tenth of a second of each other to qualify and be listed. It can show one listener in Rio de Janeiro and another in Cleveland.

Amazingly, coincidental songs occur roughly 10 times per second on Spotify! Wow. It’s pretty darn cool. You even get to hear a small clip from the common song before it moves on to the next musical coincidence. If that kind of activity is occurring on Spotify alone, imagine the kinds of numbers that would be revealed by the entire music streaming industry. And then understand that the industry is in its infancy.

Spotify, like Pandora and Netflix, has reams and reams of big data from its tens of millions of subscribers to help it better understand their preferences (and the market for streaming music). According to Kyle McDonald, Spotify’s official “Media Artist in Residence” and the creator of Serendipity, “Twenty-five to fifty million people are listening to music at any moment,” on Spotify, adding that “ten to twenty thousand songs are started every second!”

I don’t typically encourage readers to leave my site to consume outside media, but to fully appreciate Serendipity, you simply need to see it in action. Note that the video demo to which that link leads isn’t real-time. It’s simply a recording of Serendipity from earlier this year. If it starts driving you (or your significant other) crazy, you can mute the audio.

serendipity for twitterEven cooler: If you hear a song you really like and want more than the brief slice you get with Serendipity, just pause the video in the upper left corner. Spotify is a music service, after all. Serendipity is a crazy carousel of sonic spasticity; it’s like an international jukebox gone awry that lets you put things on hold to indulge in a full song. After a few cups of coffee, I really love it.

Ten to twenty thousand songs are started every second on Spotify. Wow. Those are some amazing stats. Talk about using big data. These stats—and the savvy mining and analysis thereof—point to a new generation of intelligence and understanding regarding consumer behavior, social patterns, and possibly even the roots of why things go viral or trend. Add a few super computers with some slick, gopher-like algorithms to the mix and companies like Spotify will be mining their data for gold (they already are, of course). The insight regarding their customers will be so deep that they’ll know more about them than their subscribers will know about themselves—at least in terms of streaming music online.

And that’s not creepy, like the NSA. That’s cool. It’s called giving me the songs I want. Netflix is doing it with TV shows and movies. Why shouldn’t major music streamers like Spotify analyze their data to give subscribers the best experience possible?

McDonald is obviously thinking about the future. He considers Serendipity to be a grand experiment (the tech is available in real time only on the internal Spotify network). “Imagine if we could have ‘tangled sessions’ or an app that would pair you up with someone so you could listen to the same song at the same time,” he said.

Some groovy ideas. It would be nice to see Spotify—and the streaming music space overall—leverage some of these more advanced potential features of social media and big data. Let’s get beyond Tweeting or posting to Facebook the current song we happen to be listening to. It’s stupid, narcissistic, and largely irrelevant information (even for close friends).

I personally have accounts with Google Play Music and Pandora, both of which I love. But every time I hear about one of these cool features of Spotify, I always get envious and sometimes even fantasize about switching. Spotify simply does some really cool things and seems to take a different approach. Maybe it’s because they’re Swedish. I don’t know. But whatever they’re doing, it’s working and they’re definitely thinking outside the box.

Maybe even outside Pandora’s box.

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Curt Robbins


Curt Robbins is author of the following books from Amazon Kindle:

You can follow him on Twitter at @CurtRobbins, read his AV-related blog posts at rAVe Publications, and view his photos on Flickr.

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